More spinifex texture.
(Wish me luck on my Igneous Petrology lab exam!)

LG Electornics LG-P930
Spinifex is an igneous texture formed by the rapid growth of olivine crystals in magmas of low viscosity. This texture is characteristic of ultramafic (high Fe and Mg content) rocks such as komatiites, which crystallized over 2.5 billion years ago in the Archean eon. 
(Field of view: ~500 µm). 

Spinifex is an igneous texture formed by the rapid growth of olivine crystals in magmas of low viscosity. This texture is characteristic of ultramafic (high Fe and Mg content) rocks such as komatiites, which crystallized over 2.5 billion years ago in the Archean eon. 

(Field of view: ~500 µm). 

"To the geologist a rock is more than an aggregate of minerals, it is a page of the Earth’s autobiography with a story to unfold, if only he can read the language in which the record is written."
Holmes’ Principles of Physical Geology (via earthsci-studynotes)

My science!
Seriously though, I fucking love my job.

(via hammerforscale)
A message from armygeologist19
Hey! Your blog is awesome. I'm a third year geoscience student at U of T. I'm actually going on a trip to the Grand Canyon and Death Valley in California for seds during reading week (yes, I love seds more than any other geology, feel free to make fun of me like the rest of my friends :p ) and I was wondering what kind of geology you think is the most interesting.

Hello, and thanks! I like certain types of geology for different reasons, so this is not an easy question.

Sedimentary is certainly not my favorite, although its not without its merits. I live near the Front Ranges of the Canadian Rockies (a geologist’s playground of uplifted carbonates), so when I go hiking I often collect simple marine fossils from the shales and limestones therein. I also have a secret love affair with surficial processes such as rivers and glaciers, so investigating those types of sed deposits can be kinda neat. Besides that, I don’t think sed is particularly appealing, especially on the scale of rocks and minerals. 

On the other hand, I find igneous and metamorphic pretty cool regardless of scale, and I think that’s because they tell particularly interesting stories - magmatism and mountain-building and all that fun stuff  :)  And speaking superficially, metamorphic and igneous rocks/minerals are beautiful! I could (and do) spend countless hours sitting at petrographic microscopes marveling at all the phenocrysts and funky textures I can find. One thing I find awesome (if a little complex) is applying geochemistry and textural/mineral evidence to delineate melting & cooling histories of igneous rocks. Gets me so revved. 

I’ve gotta run, but you get the point! Thanks for the question. 

Ryan

silversora:

"Dave.."
"Fuck off Shaun I am taking a picture."
"DAVE."

silversora:

"Dave.."

"Fuck off Shaun I am taking a picture."

"DAVE."

they-stole-my-robot:

jonnovstheinternet:

A megalodon tooth stuck in a whale vertebrae.

this is the most badass fossil in existence

they-stole-my-robot:

jonnovstheinternet:

A megalodon tooth stuck in a whale vertebrae.

this is the most badass fossil in existence


All of Earth’s Air and Water (via)The sphere of water is ~1400km in diameter. The ISS orbits at ~400km.The density of the air-sphere is 1atm (at sea level).

via the-science-llama


All of Earth’s Air and Water
(via)
The sphere of water is ~1400km in diameter. The ISS orbits at ~400km.
The density of the air-sphere is 1atm (at sea level).

via the-science-llama

Hello! I'm a freshman at my university and I have declared my major as Geology. I have always had an interest in the field, but am starting to second guess my decision. I was wondering what made you want to take on Geology as your major and when you knew that it was the field for you?

Hello! It’s late and I’m quite tired, so please excuse any lack of sense-make in this post. The story of why I chose geology in the first place isn’t really worth telling, but I can tell you is that I have never been more satisfied with a decision in my life. In addition to being a very practical and employable profession, the geosciences have completely changed my perspective on the world around me. Personally, I’ve always had an affinity for stories, and with every passing day I feel like the true story of our universe becomes more complete. Just thinking back on everything I’ve learned in the past few years is overwhelming!

I think what I appreciate most about geology is that the topics we cover are not restricted to any sort of physical scale, nor are they limited to any particular time. Our studies range in size from microscopic minerals and biosignatures to large-scale processes such as plate tectonics and planetary formation. We investigate the origin of the universe, present-day processes, and everything in between (andthere’s a lot in between). What I’m trying to say is that there’s no way you’ll get bored because the topics are SO DIVERSE. 

If you’re in search of the perfect blend of biology, physics, chemistry, and outdoor adventure, look no further. Geoscientists compile evidence from all disciplines of science to paint a picture of how things were and why things are. We also have field schools, which are AWESOME.

I could go on and on about why geo is for cool kids, but… It’s 3:30 AM and I have to wake up in a few hours for a biostratigraphy lab. (In which I will identify various fossils with characteristic age ranges, interpret the past environments in which they were found, and formulate a theory to explain the geologic history of the area in question. Sounds pretty cool, am I right?). 

Hope this helps. Good luck with your studies!  -Ryan

Rat’s Nest Cave, Alberta

Rat’s Nest Cave, Alberta