Also, I handed in all my assignments a day late and still got an A- in the course. BOOM BABY. 

Nikon COOLPIX S3300
I’m back from Nevada as of last week! :)  Field school is seriously the greatest. Behind me is the lovely Carlin Canyon, whose intricate geological history caused me many headaches and sleepless nights throughout the course. The twelve-or-so rock units we studied have been complicated by tilting, folding, extensional and compressional faulting, transgressions and regressions, regional switches from warm- to cold-water currents, and plenty more. 
To work out the various events and depositional settings, we spent a week hiking and mapping the area, trying our best to pinpoint any stratigraphic relationships we could. We hiked about 13 miles (21 km) each day, up hill and down dale. So pretty much I have buns of steel, call me up. 

I’m back from Nevada as of last week! :)  Field school is seriously the greatest. 
Behind me is the lovely Carlin Canyon, whose intricate geological history caused me many headaches and sleepless nights throughout the course. The twelve-or-so rock units we studied have been complicated by tilting, folding, extensional and compressional faulting, transgressions and regressions, regional switches from warm- to cold-water currents, and plenty more. 

To work out the various events and depositional settings, we spent a week hiking and mapping the area, trying our best to pinpoint any stratigraphic relationships we could. We hiked about 13 miles (21 km) each day, up hill and down dale. So pretty much I have buns of steel, call me up. 

Exciting announcement!
Tomorrow morning I depart for my second geology field school!

I’ll be heading down to the States once again. Last August we braved the desert sun of Montana, and since that was a real hit, I thought, why not brave the desert sun of NEVADA, too?!

I’ll be hiking around Carlin Canyon for the next couple of weeks, checkin’ out some rocks and fossils, mapping geologic contacts, and delineating what I’m told is a very complex and interesting geologic history. 

Here I go! 

cambriangirl1:

This is a shot from inside the Deception Island crater. You can sail straight into the crater lake from that gap in the centre of the photo. Deception is a massive 5km wide caldera which was formed during a previous eruption that caused the entire volcanic edifice to collapse in on itself.

cambriangirl1:

This is a shot from inside the Deception Island crater. You can sail straight into the crater lake from that gap in the centre of the photo. Deception is a massive 5km wide caldera which was formed during a previous eruption that caused the entire volcanic edifice to collapse in on itself.

More spinifex texture.
(Wish me luck on my Igneous Petrology lab exam!)

LG Electornics LG-P930
Spinifex is an igneous texture formed by the rapid growth of olivine crystals in magmas of low viscosity. This texture is characteristic of ultramafic (high Fe and Mg content) rocks such as komatiites, which crystallized over 2.5 billion years ago in the Archean eon. 
(Field of view: ~500 µm). 

Spinifex is an igneous texture formed by the rapid growth of olivine crystals in magmas of low viscosity. This texture is characteristic of ultramafic (high Fe and Mg content) rocks such as komatiites, which crystallized over 2.5 billion years ago in the Archean eon. 

(Field of view: ~500 µm). 

"To the geologist a rock is more than an aggregate of minerals, it is a page of the Earth’s autobiography with a story to unfold, if only he can read the language in which the record is written."
Holmes’ Principles of Physical Geology (via earthsci-studynotes)

My science!
Seriously though, I fucking love my job.

(via hammerforscale)
A message from armygeologist19
Hey! Your blog is awesome. I'm a third year geoscience student at U of T. I'm actually going on a trip to the Grand Canyon and Death Valley in California for seds during reading week (yes, I love seds more than any other geology, feel free to make fun of me like the rest of my friends :p ) and I was wondering what kind of geology you think is the most interesting.

Hello, and thanks! I like certain types of geology for different reasons, so this is not an easy question.

Sedimentary is certainly not my favorite, although its not without its merits. I live near the Front Ranges of the Canadian Rockies (a geologist’s playground of uplifted carbonates), so when I go hiking I often collect simple marine fossils from the shales and limestones therein. I also have a secret love affair with surficial processes such as rivers and glaciers, so investigating those types of sed deposits can be kinda neat. Besides that, I don’t think sed is particularly appealing, especially on the scale of rocks and minerals. 

On the other hand, I find igneous and metamorphic pretty cool regardless of scale, and I think that’s because they tell particularly interesting stories - magmatism and mountain-building and all that fun stuff  :)  And speaking superficially, metamorphic and igneous rocks/minerals are beautiful! I could (and do) spend countless hours sitting at petrographic microscopes marveling at all the phenocrysts and funky textures I can find. One thing I find awesome (if a little complex) is applying geochemistry and textural/mineral evidence to delineate melting & cooling histories of igneous rocks. Gets me so revved. 

I’ve gotta run, but you get the point! Thanks for the question. 

Ryan